Faces of Recovery: Tony, Alan, Agustin

More Faces of Recovery .

Tony‘s story.Tony_square

And Alan‘s. It’s funny how portrait drawing works: Alan smiles so much, he is funny and optimistic, and yet I couldn’t get past the his blue eyes, they looked so sad.
Alan_square

And, Agustin.
Agustin_square

I’m learning as I do these. And I’m using things I’ve learnt before too.
– Sketching on location in public places has taught me to work when being watched, and that’s super helpful.
– More importantly, though, I’ve learnt to stop voicing my anxiety about how a piece is going, or to constantly comment on something that didn’t quite work out: especially with this project, it isn’t about me and my drawing, and it isn’t about how technically correct something is. A portrait will work if I can stay present and capture character, and that means listening to the story I’m being told, not just drawing facial features.

Find every story recorded so far here.

About Suhita Shirodkar

obsessive-sketcher. graphic designer.
This entry was posted in Activism, california, Close to home, Faces Of Recovery, people, Portrait, reportage and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

15 Responses to Faces of Recovery: Tony, Alan, Agustin

  1. I can see the stories in your scetches. Well made!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I’m really enjoying reading about your Faces project and seeing your wonderful expressive sketches! Would love to talk and share experiences some time. It’s such a heart opening experience to get to hang out with these folks and hear their stories. I’m doing a series of homeless women and their pets now which brings a lot of issues into focus. -Susan

    Sent from my iPad

    >

    Liked by 1 person

  3. John Winters says:

    These were the best thing I’ve seen in a long time. A couple actually brought tears to my eyes. Thank you!!

    Like

  4. Agnès Bolley-Vittot says:

    Suhita , this is a great project you are on! I enjoyed so much the stories you share and your ability to show these people’s feelings, and profound humanity despite the despair they went through. You have an incredible way of being a witness and letting everyone’s voice heard. I wish I had the talent to sketch people so to do the same thing here in Adelaide where I live. I found the Recovery Cafe an amazing human adventure! keep these stories coming.

    Like

  5. ഭരതൻ says:

    The project seems to go on well. Turn your eyes on to the subaltern classes including
    Dalits, untouchables, transgenders and the unnoticed ones because their stories are the least heard. They do want to talk. Go on.. Find more who belong to the lowest strata of society. It helps you to learn life more and to lead a life worthwhile

    Like

  6. I really love ‘meeting’ the people you are listening to and drawing. I feel a mixture of empathy, sadness, amazement and complete respect at people’s courage and determination in the face of some really tough circumstances. It could happen to any of us and who knows how we might respond.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Caroline Greene says:

    P.S. I meant to add, lots of hope too in their stories of recovery.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. “More importantly, though, I’ve learnt to stop voicing my anxiety about how a piece is going, or to constantly comment on something that didn’t quite work out: especially with this project, it isn’t about me and my drawing, and it isn’t about how technically correct something is. A portrait will work if I can stay present and capture character, and that means listening to the story I’m being told, not just drawing facial features.” So true and wise – but far from easy. Kudos for this work.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Michael, true, it’s not easy, but it comes with practice. I find I still get anxious about a piece not going like i expect it to, but I’ve learnt to keep focussed on my subject, not me, and it always helps.

      Like

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